Category: "Alchemy"

Embedded Alchemy

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Alchemy is a collection of independent library components that specifically relate to efficient low-level constructs used with embedded and network programming.

The latest version of Embedded Alchemy[^] can be found on GitHub.
The most recent entries as well as Alchemy topics to be posted soon:
  • Steganography[^]
  • Coming Soon: Alchemy: Data View
  • Coming Soon: Quad (Copter) of the Damned
Alchemy: Documentation[^]

I just completed my Masters Degree in Cybersecurity at Johns Hopkins University. I plan to resume Alchemy's development. I plan to use my newly acquired knowledge to add constructs that will help improve the security of devices built for the Internet of (Insecure) Things.

Alchemy: BitLists Mk1

CodeProject, C++, Alchemy, design Send feedback »

A continuation of a series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. The library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs low-level data serialization. It is written in C++ using template meta-programming.

At this point, I was still in the make it work phase of implementation. However, I learned quite a bit from experiencing the progression of design and multiple implementations. So much that I thought it was valuable enough to share.

After the initial creation of the Datum type, it was relatively simple to abstract the design and implement the Bit-Field. object. The next step was to combine the collection of BitField objects into a single group that could be statically-verified as type-safe. This was also relatively simple. Again I just had to model the implementation of the message structure. I called this collection a BitList. Primarily to differentiate it from the std::bitset.

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Alchemy: BitField

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This is an entry for the continuing series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. This library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs data serialization and it is written in C++.

After I had proven to myself that serializing data with a template meta-program was feasible, I started to research what features would be required to make this a useful library. After the fundamental data types, I noticed that sub-byte access of bits appeared quite often in network packet formats, bit-fields. I have also worked in my share of code that implemented these packet formats using the bit-field feature in C/C++.

I decided support for accessing values at the bit-level needed to be a feature of Alchemy. I will explain why, as well as show my first attempt to make this work.

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Alchemy: Message Serialization

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This is an entry for the continuing series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. This library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs data serialization and it is written in C++. This is an Open Source project and can be found at GitHub.

If you have read the previous Alchemy entries you know that I have now shown the structure of the Message host. I have also demonstrated how the different fields are pragmatically processed to convert the byte-order of the message. In the previous Alchemy post I put together the internal memory management object. All of the pieces are in place to demonstrate the final component to the core of Alchemy, serialization.

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Alchemy: Message Buffer

adaptability, portability, reliability, CodeProject, C++, maintainability, Alchemy, design Send feedback »

This is an entry for the continuing series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. This library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs data serialization and it is written in C++. This is an Open Source project and can be found at GitHub.

Previously I posted the first prototype that demonstrates that the concept of Alchemy is both feasible and useful. However, the article ended up being much longer than I had anticipated and was unable to cover serializing the user object to and from a data stream. This entry will finish the prototype by adding serialization capabilities to the prototype for the basic datum fields that have already been specified.

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Alchemy: Prototype

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This is an entry for the continuing series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. This library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs data serialization and it is written in C++.

I have written about many of the concepts that are required to implement Alchemy. However, up to this point Alchemy has only remained an idea. It's time to use the concepts that I have demonstrated in previous entries and create a prototype of the library. This will allow us to evaluate its value and determine if it has the potential to fulfill its intended goals.

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Alchemy: Data

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This is an entry for the continuing series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. This library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs data serialization and it is written in C++.

By using the template construct, Typelist, I have implemented a basis for navigating the individual data fields in an Alchemy message definition. The Typelist contains no data. This entry describes the foundation and concepts to manage and provide the user access to data in a natural and expressive way.

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Alchemy: Message Interface

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This is an entry for the continuing series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. This library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs data serialization and it is written in C++.

I presented the design and initial implementation of the Datum[^] object in my previous Alchemy post. A Datum object provides the user with a natural interface to access each data field. This entry focuses on the message body that will contain the Datum objects, as well as a message buffer to store the data. I prefer to get a basis prototype up and running as soon as possible in early design & development in order to observe potential design issues that were not initially considered. In fact, with a first pass implementation that has had relatively little time invested, I am more willing to throw away work if it will lead to a better solution.

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Alchemy: Typelist Operations

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This is an entry for the continuing series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. This library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs data serialization and it is written in C++.

I discussed the Typelist with greater detail in my previous post. However, up to this point I haven't demonstrated any practical uses for the Typelist. In this entry, I will further develop operations for use with the Typelist. In order to implement the final operations in this entry, I will need to rely on, and apply the operations that are developed at the beginning in order to create a simple and elegant solution.

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Typelist Operations

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I would like to devote this entry to further discuss the Typelist data type. Previously, I explored the Typelist[^] for use in my network library, Alchemy[^]. I decided that it would be a better construct for managing type info than the std::tuple. The primary reason is the is no data associated with the types placed within the. On the other hand, std::tuple manages data values internally, similar to std::pair. However, this extra storage would cause some challenging conflicts for problems that we will be solving in the near future. I would not have foreseen this, had I not already created an initial version of this library as a proof of concept. I will be sure to elaborate more on this topic when it becomes more relevant.

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Preprocessor Code Generation

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I really do not like MACROs in C and C++, at least the way they have been traditionally used starting with C. Many of these uses are antiquated because of better feature support with C++. The primary uses are inline function calls and constant declarations. With the possibility of MACRO instantiation side-effects, and all of the different ways a programmer can use a function, it is very difficult to write it correctly for all scenarios. And when a problem does occur, you cannot be certain what is being generated and compiled unless you look at the output from the preprocessor to determine if it is what you had intended.

However, there is still one use of MACROs, that I think makes them too valuable for the preprocessor to be removed altogether. This use is code generation in definitions. What I mean by that, is hiding cumbersome boiler-plate definitions that cannot easily be replicated without resorting to manual cut-and-paste editing. Cut-and-Paste is notorious for its likelihood of introducing bugs. I want to discuss some of the features that cannot be matched without the preprocessor, and set some guidelines that will help keep problems caused by preprocessor misuse to a minimum.

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