Tag: "Design"

C++: Template Meta-Programming 2.0

CodeProject, C++ 2 feedbacks »

I was amazed after I had converted only the first few portions of the TypeList from the C++98 implementation to Modern C++. I have decided to convert my Alchemy API to use Modern C++ in order to truly learn the nuances by application of acquired knowledge. The code of these meta-programs are very elegant and completely readable. This really does feel like a new language, and an entirely new version of meta-programming.

The elegance enabled by the new constructs will allow me to present a complete TypeList implementation for Modern C++ in this entry.

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When are we gonna learn?

communication, CodeProject, design, knowledge, engineering Send feedback »

As you gain expertise you begin to realize how little you actually know and understand. I have found this to be true of most skills. It’s easy to fall into the trap where you believe that you continue to grow your expertise each year, and thus have less and less to learn. Read on and I will demonstrate what I mean.

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Alchemy: Array / Vector Serialization

C++, maintainability, Alchemy, design Send feedback »

A continuation of a series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. The library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs low-level data serialization with compile-time reflection. It is written in C++ using template meta-programming.

The alterations required up to this point have been relatively minor to integrate arrays and vectors into Alchemy. That does not mean that the solutions were clean and simple from the beginning. The exercise for integrating the serialization support of these containers was quite challenging. These containers became especially challenging because of the possibilities they created for flexibility with data management

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Alchemy: Proxy Fields

adaptability, C++, Alchemy, design Send feedback »

A continuation of a series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. The library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs low-level data serialization with compile-time reflection. It is written in C++ using template meta-programming.

After I had completed my initial targetted set of features for Alchemy, demonstrated the library to my colleagues, and received the initial round of feedback, I was ready to correct some mistakes. The completion of nested structures in my API was very challenging for many reasons. This required each object to know entirely too much about the other constructs in the system. I was very motivated to find an elegant and effective solution because the next feature I decided to tackle would be very challenging, support for arrays. I turned to Proxies to solve this problem.

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Alchemy: Nested Types

C++, Alchemy, design Send feedback »

A continuation of a series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. The library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs low-level data serialization with compile-time reflection. It is written in C++ using template meta-programming.

I am almost done describing the first set of features that I was targeting when I set out to create Alchemy. The only remaining feature to be documented is the ability to have nested types. Basically, structs within structs. This entry describes the approach that I took as well as some of the challenges that I had to conquer in order to create a usable solution.

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Alchemy: BitLists Mk2

CodeProject, C++, maintainability, Alchemy, design, engineering Send feedback »

A continuation of a series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. The library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs low-level data serialization with compile-time reflection. It is written in C++ using template meta-programming.

With my first attempt at creating Alchemy, I created an object that emulated the behavior of bit-fields, yet still resulted in a packed-bit format that was ABI compatible for portable wire transfer protocols. You can read about my design and development experiences regarding the first attempt here Alchemy: BitLists Mk1[^].

My first attempt truly was the epitome of Make it work. Because I didn't even know if what I was attempting was possible. After I released it, I quickly received feedback regarding defects, additional feature requests, and even reported problems with it's poor performance. This pass represents the Make it right phase.

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Coupling and Cohesion

adaptability, CodeProject, maintainability, design 9 feedbacks »

Coupling and Cohesion are two properties that deserve your attention when you design software. These are important because they have a direct effect on how flexible and maintainable your software will be as your software continues to e developed. Will you be able to reuse it? Will you be able to adapt it? Will you need a shoe-horn to force that new feature in the future? These questions are much simpler to answer when you can properly gauge the level of Coupling and Cohesion of your components.

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Alchemy: BitLists Mk1

CodeProject, C++, Alchemy, design Send feedback »

A continuation of a series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. The library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs low-level data serialization. It is written in C++ using template meta-programming.

At this point, I was still in the make it work phase of implementation. However, I learned quite a bit from experiencing the progression of design and multiple implementations. So much that I thought it was valuable enough to share.

After the initial creation of the Datum type, it was relatively simple to abstract the design and implement the Bit-Field. object. The next step was to combine the collection of BitField objects into a single group that could be statically-verified as type-safe. This was also relatively simple. Again I just had to model the implementation of the message structure. I called this collection a BitList. Primarily to differentiate it from the std::bitset.

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Alchemy: BitField

portability, CodeProject, C++, Alchemy, design Send feedback »

This is an entry for the continuing series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. This library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs data serialization and it is written in C++.

After I had proven to myself that serializing data with a template meta-program was feasible, I started to research what features would be required to make this a useful library. After the fundamental data types, I noticed that sub-byte access of bits appeared quite often in network packet formats, bit-fields. I have also worked in my share of code that implemented these packet formats using the bit-field feature in C/C++.

I decided support for accessing values at the bit-level needed to be a feature of Alchemy. I will explain why, as well as show my first attempt to make this work.

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Are You Mocking Me?!

general, adaptability, portability, CodeProject, maintainability Send feedback »

It seems that every developer has their own way of doing things. I know I have my own methodologies, and some probably are not the simplest or the best (that I am aware of). I have continued to refine me design, development, test and software support skills through my career.

I recognize that everyone has their own experiences, so I usually do not question or try to change someone else's process. I will attempt to suggest if I think it might help. However, sometimes I just have to ask, "are you sure you know what you are doing?" For this entry I want to focus on unit testing, specifically with Mock Objects.

  

Are you sure you know what you are doing?

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