Category: "engineering"

Rvalue References Applied

C++, Alchemy, engineering Send feedback »

A continuation of a series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. The library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs automated data serialization with compile-time reflection. It is written in C++ using template meta-programming.

My previous entry was a condensed overview on rvalue references. I described the differences between value expressions and types. I also summarized as much wisdom as I could collect regarding how to effectively use move semantics and perfect-forwarding. After I completed the essay, I was eager to integrate move semantics for my serialization objects in Alchemy. This entry is a journal of my experience optimizing my library with rvalue references.

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Why Does a CS Degree Require So Much Math?

general, CodeProject, engineering Send feedback »

Over the years I have heard this question or criticism many times:

Why is so much math required for a computer science degree?

I never questioned the amount of math that was required to earn my degree. I enjoy learning, especially math and science. Although, a few of the classes felt like punishment. I remember the latter part of the semester in Probability was especially difficult at the time. Possibly because I was challenged with a new way of thinking that is required for these problems, which can be counter-intuitive.

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When are we gonna learn?

communication, CodeProject, design, knowledge, engineering Send feedback »

As you gain expertise you begin to realize how little you actually know and understand. I have found this to be true of most skills. It’s easy to fall into the trap where you believe that you continue to grow your expertise each year, and thus have less and less to learn. Read on and I will demonstrate what I mean.

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Alchemy: Benchmarks and Optimizations

general, CodeProject, C++, Alchemy, engineering, optimize Send feedback »

A continuation of a series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. The library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs automated data serialization with compile-time reflection. It is written in C++ using template meta-programming.

Benchmark testing and code profiling is a phase that can often be avoided for the majority of development. That is, if you develop wisely. Selecting appropriate data structures and algorithms for the task at hand. Avoiding pre-mature optimization is about not getting caught up on the minute details before you even have a working system. That doesn’t mean to through out good decision making altogether. Well I have reached the point in Alchemy, where I have a feature-set that is rich enough to make this a useful library. This entry chronicles my discoveries for how well Alchemy performs and the steps I have taken to find and improve the areas where improvement has been required.

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Alchemy: BitLists Mk2

CodeProject, C++, maintainability, Alchemy, design, engineering Send feedback »

A continuation of a series of blog entries that documents the design and implementation process of a library. The library is called, Network Alchemy[^]. Alchemy performs low-level data serialization with compile-time reflection. It is written in C++ using template meta-programming.

With my first attempt at creating Alchemy, I created an object that emulated the behavior of bit-fields, yet still resulted in a packed-bit format that was ABI compatible for portable wire transfer protocols. You can read about my design and development experiences regarding the first attempt here Alchemy: BitLists Mk1[^].

My first attempt truly was the epitome of Make it work. Because I didn't even know if what I was attempting was possible. After I released it, I quickly received feedback regarding defects, additional feature requests, and even reported problems with it's poor performance. This pass represents the Make it right phase.

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What Is a Software Architect?

general, leadership, communication, CodeProject, engineering Send feedback »

There is so much confusion surrounding the purpose of a Software Architect and the value they provide and what they are supposed to do. So much so, that it seems the title is being used less and less by companies and replaced with a different title such as principal or staff. I assume this is due to the perception there must be a way to distinguish a level above senior, which is handed out after only about three years of experience.

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